Not Everything Remains As It Was for Eluveitie

Eluveitie is a Swiss folk and pagan metal band, unique in that they mix the usual elements of metal, electric guitars, growling lyrics with a few instruments that you don’t hear every day like bag pipes, tin whistles, and even a hurdy gurdy. Here’s a review of their fourth studio album, Everything Remains (As It Never Was), which was released earlier this week.

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Eluveitie is a Swiss folk and pagan metal band, unique in that they mix the usual elements of metal, electric guitars, growling lyrics with a few instruments that you don’t hear every day like bag pipes, tin whistles, and even a hurdy gurdy. Their fourth studio album Everything Remains (As It Never Was) was released earlier this week.

Since their transition to Nuclear Blast, Eluveitie’s sound has changed with each album. Slania relied mainly on the growling male vocals from front man Chrigel Glanzmann, while last year’s Evocation I – The Arcane Dominion took a more Celtic route and featured Meri Tadic as the main vocalist. Everything Remains returns to the heavier sound of Slania, but though its use of instrumentals is merges the styles of the two albums effectively.

“Otherworld” is basically an intro, but things get moving right away with the title track. “Everything Remains (As It Never Was)” has a mix of female and male vocals. The album’s first single, “Thousandfold,” is similar to “Inis Mona” from Slania. “Nil” continues in much of the same vein. “The Essence of Ashes” keeps the male vocals, but slows things down a bit and incorporates some chanting parts and instrumental sections.

“Isara” switches to the sound heard more on Evocation I, an instrumental track featuring tin whistle and acoustic guitar. “Kingdom Come Undone” rips right back into the heavy growling, aggressive sound, however. “Quoth The Raven” includes both male and female vocals, electric guitar also merges nicely with the hurdy gurdy throughout. “(Do)Minion” is the album’s longest and heaviest track. “Setlon” is another instrumental and perhaps the album’s catchiest tune, with its neat quick, light whistle parts. “Lugdunon” is another hybrid of Eluveitie’s two styles with one of their widest ranging instrumental sections yet.

Standouts: Quoth The Raven, Setlon, Thousandfold, Lugdunon

Originally published March 13, 2010.

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