What Are You Talking About? Facebook is Private

As someone who is conscious that what I put on the internet has consequences I welcome things being public because responsible handling of what I put out there will allow me to build a strong personal brand over a period of years. So the day somebody takes the time to search me on Google and brings up a list of my tweets and Facebook updates, it’ll make them want to hire me.

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I had no problem with Facebook making my likes and dislikes public a few weeks ago.

As someone who is conscious that what I put on the internet has consequences I welcome things being public because responsible handling of what I put out there will allow me to build a strong personal brand over a period of years. So the day somebody takes the time to search me on Google and brings up a list of my tweets and Facebook updates, it’ll make them want to hire me.

In the years to come technology will become so intertwined in our lives that people will laugh if you try to maintain the privacy standards that are normal today. I’ve said it before: Facebook is online communication on training wheels.

I constantly find myself returning to the same few videos or articles and wondering when people will get what these guys are saying. At the top of that list is Jesse Schell’s speech on how computers are going to be everywhere.

Last week Schell tweeted about 7 Eleven’s new game: You buy Slurpees we’ll give you stuff in FarmVille or Mafia Wars.

I’ve never understood the appeal of these games, from what I can figure out the people that play them have no idea that you can actually go to the store and buy RPGs with vast stories and incredible graphics, and have had that option for decades. For me Facebook is about the real world, not escape from it.

That doesn’t change the fact, however, that people are nuts about them. I have Facebook friends that devote the one status update they post every month to their dire need to finishing up that chicken coop. I hide all game updates from my news feed so I can never figure out why these people are in my list of online friends so often when they never post updates; then “PLeeeZ need 2 more BriCks!!!!!!!” pops up and I realize, “Oh, that’s why they’re always doing.”

Anyway, back to Slurpees. Is it crazy for people to spend real money on virtual goods? Maybe. It’s been done for a lot longer than Facebook’s existence—and at a far higher price tag than a cup of Incredible Orange. People will do it. A lot of people will, and a heck of a lot more products will be brought into the fold soon.

Before I’m called a hypocrite I’ll admit that not everything on my Facebook profile can be viewed by everyone. If I don’t know you, you really have no need for my phone number. I have about six e-mail addresses and a Twitter account; it’s easy to get ahold of me.

Some comments I make will reference things that only my friends will understand, like something about my small hometown. I won’t put that on Twitter, because you won’t get it anyway. Other things are the opposite, it’s all about the audience.

Someday, however, that audience might always be the whole world. It’s expanding right now.

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